How to live and work abroad

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We’ve all been there. You check-in to your hotel and spend two glorious weeks basking in sunshine only to dread the return flight home. While for many people, returning from holiday is something of a necessary evil, there are those who choose to stay on at their holiday destination – living and working abroad as an expatriate. If this is an idea that appeals to you, ex-pat and travel expert Niall Dennis tells us his quick checklist of the basics…

1. Find a job

Odd Jobs - never pay for a hotel on GlobalGrasshopper.com 

Okay this maybe an obvious one but unless you’re lucky enough to be working remotely you’ll need to earn money to support yourself in a foreign country. There are many websites dedicated to finding work abroad, I use Expatjobs.eu which has positions in 140 countries.

2. Get a place to live

Father Ted's house 

If you’re moving abroad with your work then they may help you find suitable accommodation. If not, then you’ll need to look for yourself. Take as much advice as possible and make sure you consider the security and crime rate of different areas as well as the cost of lodgings and proximity to key attractions or your place of work.

3. Sort your finances

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There are many financial considerations to make when moving abroad – whether permanently or temporarily. One of the most important is how you will access your finances while in a foreign country.Opening a bank account in the country you intend to live is advisable but you’ll probably want to keep your existing UK bank account too. Look for banks which offer affordable international transfers and research online banking options that can make financial management a lot easier. You’ll also need to consider things like your UK property. If you are a homeowner then renting it out to cover mortgage payment or increase cash flow is one option but you’ll probably want to appoint an estate agent or representative to ensure everything runs smoothly while you’re out of the country. If you’re a tenant then you’ll more than likely want to give notice on your tenancy and move your stuff out. If you can’t store this with friends or family then it may be worth paying for a secure storage facility instead.

4. Protect your health

Spa health retreat on GlobalGrasshopper.com 

Not all countries have a National Health Service (NHS) like the UK so it’s important you think of how you’ll safeguard your health whilst living and working abroad. Cigna expat insurance is a great example of the sort of policy you can get to obtain top medical protection and gives both you and your family access to the best healthcare available.

5. Enjoy it!

 Tuk-Tuk-Bangkok

Finally, enjoy your new life abroad regardless of whether it’s a permanent or temporary relocation! Take in the main tourist attractions but also wander off the beaten track and discover hidden gems that define an area. Living in a different country isn’t without its potential pitfalls but if you plan carefully you’ll open yourself up to a whole new world, I promise you won’t regret it!

Scott started his travelling life back in 1999, when he headed off on a solo jaunt to South Africa, Australia, New Zealand and South East Asia with just a backpack, a camera and a spirit for adventure. After that, the travel bug bit hard and now he is always seeking to head off somewhere new. Over the years he has lived in Italy, Qatar, Ireland and the UK but his spiritual home will always be Rome as this is the city which most satisfies his unrelenting craving for culture, good food and football. Scott loves nothing better than to be behind the camera and has also just started his own blog called Bars and Spas. As well as Rome he also counts Melbourne and Tel Aviv among his favourite places and now permanently resides in Dublin. Follow Scott on Google+ and Twitter

2 Comments

  • Mark

    6 May, 2014 at 11:26 pm

    Finding a job is one way to go. Since starting my business a few years ago, I haven’t had a need for a job but am looking for a way to become location independent. It is a challenge though.

    I agree that having good health is another important way to go. Especially if I want to enjoy hiking a volcano or kayaking in Guatemala. Thanks for posting.

    Reply

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